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Contact_FullName: Narelle

Contact_Email: rellie@bigpond.com

date:: 01/20/02

Area: machines-woodworking

Idea:

My group of 4/5 yr olds spent about a month taking old computers, toasters, hairdryers apart each morning (with adult supervision). After dismantling a huge array of appliances and keeping the safe pieces we then began to nail and screw small pieces onto softwood. Each child went home with a "machine collage" that looked spectacular!


Name:
caroline
Email:
flacinski@yahoo.com

12-6-00

To introduce hammering cover chunks of Styrofoam (squares, balls, rectangles, etc.) with inexpensive lightweight cotton or polyester. Cover loosely and close the edges the whole way around. Using meat mallets as hammers and golf tees as nails, let the children hammer the "nails into the blocks". The activity is a self contained mess and can be thrown away when pulverized.


Name:
Kristi
Email:
klbeach@csrlink.net

11-18-00

In the woodworking center, I put various kinds of squash for the children to pound golf tees into with plastic hammers. They love this.....especially the pumpkins!!


Contact_FullName:
Cassie
Contact_Email:
casleray@teacher.com

11-7-00

Try using plastic saws with the Styrofoam. As long as the saws have ridged 'teeth' they will cut through the Styrofoam. It does make a mess, but the children love it and it is a lot safer than real saws.


Contact_FullName:
Renee
Contact_Email:
renee3339@hotmail.com

11-5-00

In our preschool 4's class, we put screws into some wood blocks with a screwdriver. Then, we put these in our woodworking area along with knobs that could screw onto each different sized screw.


Contact_FullName:
Dody
Contact_Email:
dody29@hotmail.com

10-30-00

In the fall collect a variety of leaves. At the woodworking table place a block of wood on the table then place your leaf on top. Cover your leaf with a small scrap of white fabric, or muslin. Use hammers or small blocks to bang on the fabric. The colors from the leaves comes out on the fabric. This also works with flowers.


Contact_FullName:
cathy
Contact_Email:
 

8-21-00

Use ceiling tiles to pound nails into when introducing your woodworking area. They are not as messy as Styrofoam and can be found at your local building supply store.  I use roofing nails since they have larger heads.


Contact_FullName:
Cathy
Contact_Email:
Beaconchic@aol.com

7-12-00

Once a year I bring in tools for a special "Tool Day". It usually follows my mother's Day project where the children sand, stain, and decoupage their own mother's day photo frame from a 5x7 piece of wood. We use tape measures, nails, screws, hammers, locks and keys, screwdrivers, etc. Of course, all of this is done under supervision in small groups and they get to take home their sample piece of wood with the hardware included. I get raves from the parents and I have never had a child hurt w/ these instruments. I love it because it is so "hands on".


Contact_FullName:
Pamela
Contact_Email:
AprlFool63

5-6-00

In my woodworking center, I use Styrofoam pieces which you can purchase at any craft store. For example, during Christmas, I used Styrofoam wreath shapes. I cut out green leaves from green construction paper and red bows. They nailed them on with plastic hammers and golf tees. I also added green cone shapes. Here, the nailed on colored golf tees for lights. For January, the made snowman using various shapes of Styrofoam balls and once again, I cut out decorations from construction paper. We have made flowers, ladybugs, ants, boats, etc. You can let your imagination go wild. The kids will even enhance it more with their imagination.


Contact_FullName:
Darlene Brown
Contact_Email:
Ajaxbrowns@AOL.com

Date: 4-5-00

SENSORY BLOCK AREA I was doing senses as a topic and came up with painting pieces of wood with Kool-aid. I used scrap wood from a lumberyard I added food coloring to the Kool-aid instead of water. (I also added a bit of hand soap to the mixture as this stains) The wood smelt for days the children then glued and hammered the wood to make different objects.


Contact_FullName:
mary
Contact_Email:
mafa11@aol.com

Date: 3-11-00

My woodworking bench stays busy when there is "something to build". Lumber is expensive, but my neighborhood Home Depot let me collect scrap lumber from their wood cutting area for free!! So I now visit them about once a week after work to see what's available. Maybe yours will, too!


Contact_FullName:
Beverly
Contact_Email:
zondag@megsinet.com

Date: 3-1-00

I also like to teach the children about screwdrivers and screws. After a few weeks of hammering golf tees into Styrofoam, I remove the hammers and golf tees from the center. Then I introduce screwdrivers and screws. I have two types of screwdrivers: regular and Phillips head and regular screws and Phillips head screws. The children and I talk and decide which screwdriver matches with which screw. We also talk and practice the twisting motion which a screw takes. I continue to use Styrofoam pieces for the children to practice with. In the woodworking area it is so important for the children to understand and use the right tool for the right job. I have friends saving Styrofoam (TVs, CD players, etc. all come with Styrofoam) for me all the time. Styrofoam trays from the grocery store also work well. Styrofoam can get messy, but it's worth the mess.


Contact_FullName:
Esther
Contact_Email:
DEGrossman

Date: 3-1-00

I duct taped a 4 foot by 2 foot. Sheet of "bubble pack" to our paneled wall. I laid four wooden mallets (that we use for clay) under it. 20 months- four years old really enjoyed banging away with no damage to the wall. This can also be done on a table.


Contact_FullName:
Beverly
Contact_Email:
zonday@megsinet.com

Date: 2-26-00

Try sanding in your woodworking area. I use a 2" X 4"X 6" piece of scrap pine ( different lengths of 2 X 4's work great) and draw a smiley face on the wood with a permanent marker. I put two different grades of sand paper out, usually one that is coarse and one that is very fine. I encourage the children to sand the smiley faces off. This is also a great sensory activity as the pine wood gives off a scent. I have also made sanding blocks by stapling sandpaper around a small block (a child's hand size) of scrap wood. To be in the woodworking center, the children wear a child-size apron and safety goggles. It helps to keep the area safe and fun.


Contact_FullName:
Leisa
Contact_Email:
rcloward@castlenet.com

Date: 1-11-00

Along with our wood working bench, I have a small table in the wood working area I cover with newspaper. I then put out construction paper, woodsies (pre cut wood shapes found in most craft stores), and wood glue. There is patterns to use as examples in the woodsies package, but it is fun to see how creative the children can be!


Contact_FullName:
Julie
Contact_Email:
jib_75069@yahoo.com

Date: 1-9-00

After moving from golf tees and Styrofoam to real nails and wood, my children sometimes have difficulty holding the nails steady. A tip I learned was to take a small square of paper, push the nail through it, and then have the children hold the paper, instead of the nail. This gives them something to hold onto, and when they have the nail pounded in, they can just pull the paper out. Lots less smashed fingers this way!


Contact_FullName:
Betsy
Contact_Email:
betsy_brummett@yahoo.com

Dater: 1-6-00

When my neighbor cut down his tree I asked him for a 4'section. I took it to school and set it on the wood table. I had to child size saws to go with it. There was only room for two kids) We started sawing on it 3 years ago. We may make it through it this year. There is always someone sawing on it. I do this with 4's and 5's. (Just be sure they are both facing the same way)


Contact_FullName:
Betsy
Contact_Email:
bgibbs@fullerton.edu

Date: 12-11-99

One of the tools you should have is an awl for the teacher to use. Tap on the back of the awl to make a hole where the child will start a nail. This makes it possible for the child to get the nail started successfully.


 

Contact_FullName: Lesley 
Contact_Email:
rebel@eon.net.au

idea

In our woodworking area we add a range of nuts and small pieces of bush wood (Australia). The kids love combining the bush bits with timber yard off-cuts. For a special treat I sometimes provide glitter paints for them to use.

Date: 12-5-99


Contact_FullName: kristy
Contact_Email: kristymc24

idea

Ask a local high school shop teacher to have their students come to your school and show them what they made in shop class.

Date: 10-14-99


Contact_FullName: Maschille
Contact_Email: braksbo@aol.com

idea

Many people don't know about the great service that your local Home Depot provides. By contacting the store you can arrange for a representative to come to your class or you can go to the store and they will provide a woodworking project with the materials and instructor free of charge. I did this with my kinders last year, we made picture frames and they loved it!

Date: 10-1-99


Contact_FullName: Shelley
Contact_Email: swk65@aol.com

idea

Ask parents to donate the scrap wood from karate classes. You will have to clean cut the edges and sand lightly but you will have a never ending supply of scrap wood.


Contact_FullName: michelle
Contact_Email: leeanncollet@yahoo.com

idea

Large cardboard boxes e.g. washing machine, refrigerator from local appliance stores are great for the children to work with. Saws can be used for cutting doors, windows, in what will become a house. Cardboard also easy to hand drill. Also provide PVA glue and wallpaper to decorate.

Date: 9-9-99


Contact_FullName: Jessica
Contact_Email:  

idea

We bring out our woodworking table every spring. Last year, we expanded the opportunities by supplying cut up 2 x 4's, dowel slices with holes drilled in the middle, lathing strips and 1 x 1 's, etc. The children were encouraged to use their imaginations. Such results: we had cars, busses, trains, dinosaurs, robots, and space shuttles. The children then painted their creations. Some fast learners made three and four projects. The parents were so impressed. We kept running out of dowel slices, however. Things with "wheels" and "buttons" were very popular. The children could put a nail through the hole in the middle so the dowel slice could turn. Threes and Fours participated in this, however, the Fours really got into it! We also made play dough with sawdust, but the kids hated it. They thought it was too scratchy.

Date: 9-9-99


Name: Sjonia Email: Marshall

Date: 7-27-99

I looked through and notice the wonderful ideas that were posted and thought this would help someone else. I went to the local hard ware store and asked for old carpet, tile, paint samples. I was pleased when I got about thirty from each request. I showed my children how to put tile down by using some glue and a shoe box after wards we glue the paint samples to the walls. added furniture with thread spools and misc. stuff we put the top of the shoe box on and added tiles to the roof I explained to them about the different roofs and there they built a house for a bug. we found some and fed them daily. This project from finish to start took us six days about twenty minutes a day however they learned allot.


 

Name:
Julie
Email:
jartman@suite224.net

Date: 7-12-99

I use a specific progression when introducing woodworking to my preschoolers. We begin by always using safety goggles. I then introduce plastic hammers, golf tees, and Styrofoam in September. By October, I have a "feel" as to how trustworthy by students are with the tools. I then provide them with pumpkins to pound golf tees into in October. When November rolls around, we're ready for turkeys (ha, ha). Actually, we move on to the real thing. I introduce claw hammers, roofing nails and a couple of cross sections from a log (it lies flat and is an easy target). After the children have gone through this progression, they are then ready for small pieces of wood, nails with a smaller head and even various hammers. Have fun!!!!!


Name:
April
Email:
aprilwork@aol.com

Date: 7-8-99

I teach young toddlers and in my wood-working area I set up on trays, or in my sensory table, plastic tools and wood pieces. The children explore these materials and have fun with them. I also add cars to the area.


Name:
Marlene
Email:
xrecasens@sympatico.com

Date: 6-30-99

Hello everyone, this is my first time submitting an idea. After reading the other ideas I felt compelled to share how wonderful it feels to know that other E.C.E.'s are encouraging children to explore the world of woodworking. Recently I started a new job in a terrific nursery school, the woodworking area consisted of the work shop from Little Tikes. The children seldom used it, I asked my husband to make a wood working table that was child sized, safe and durable. He spent several hours in the garage and when the master piece was finished I brought it into work. I purchased child sized hammers at the dollar store, a few small tape measures, sand paper of various textures, some real paint brushes and swimming goggles. Well, the children gathered around as I introduced it and discussed the safety issues of course. For the last five weeks the Little Tikes workbench was left standing alone. It is now in storage and the new work bench is busy and loud. We added a few pencils and pads of paper for pre-writing and pre-reading skills along with used yogurt containers with colored construction paper around the outside for imaginary paints. I brought in a few scraps from the local housing developments for the children to add on. When we explored insects the children used scraps of felt to hammer onto the wood pieces to create their own insects. The children, parents and I were thrilled. Now that the nursery school is closed for the summer I will have to pick up some magazines about wood working as suggested by fellow E.C.E.'s. Thanks for your ideas everyone! Kids and Laughter, Marlene.


Name:
Lynn
E-Mail:
gregg2lynn@aol.com

Date: 6-28-99

When introducing hammers and nails to your children keep their fingers safe! Use large plastic combs as holders for the nails. You can slide a nail in between the teeth, then use the comb to hold the nail at a safe distance from the hammer! Stick to the strictest rule- safety goggles must be worn while in the woodworking area!!


Name:

Margie
Email:
mbulger@hotmail.com
 

Date: 5-25-99

ACTIVITY: WOOD MATCH UP

AGES: 3-5 years

AREA OF ROOM: Woodworking, Science, Math, Manipulatives, Outdoors

MATERIALS: 1. Hanging wood samples (you will find these at your local Home Depot/Builders Square in the kitchen area...they are the samples of Formica counter top colors...just take 2 each of a few different shades of wood) 2. Pine square board with nails or safe-type hooks spaced out approx. 2-3 inches.

PROCEDURE: 1. Show the children each sample, talk about the different colors...their names...etc. 2. Hang one of each color on each hook/nail, etc. 3. The children can hang the 2nd...to MATCH to the one hanging.

I HOPE THIS IS EXPLAINED WELL ENOUGH TO UNDERSTAND.


 

Name:
Lynn
Email:
Lynnnolk@aol.com
 

Date: 5-25-99

Woodworking My woodworking bench is always teacher supervised. I have wood, nails, plastic bottle caps from milk cartons, metal juice can lids kids love to make cars.) rug scraps taken from sample books (I cut them to a smaller size.) also pieces of leather. I then let the children paint their creations.


 

Name:
Paula
Email:
ringwood-8@juno.com
 

Date: 5-25-99

Pound some large nails halfway into a 4x4 chunk of lumber, or even a small chunk from a tree trunk, and give the children a small lightweight hammer so they can pound to their hearts delight! Encourages accuracy, dexterity, and makes them feel very grown up to be using "real tools"......


 

Name:
Eileen
Email:
epblv@aol.com

Date: 5-25-99

Our preschool class of 4's, took small square pieces of wood and made geo-boards. They then took their own board home to use with rubber bands. We also have the child write their initial or initials on the wood with a pencil, then hammer in nails to form those initials. Use the workbench as an opportunity to reinforce the letters or numbers you are covering in class.


 

Name:
Barbe
Email:
portersa@willapabay.org
 

Date: 5-25-99

I have used Styrofoam sheet packing material with "drywall" screws and 2 Phillips screwdrivers in the texture table. After the children become comfortable with the screwdrivers, I would add a pair of small saws.

After spring break, I place 2 or 3 tree rounds (sections of a log about 18 to 20" tall and 10 to 12" wide) in the block center, with hammers, roofing nails, goggles and a sign in sheet. The children must sign up for the activity and count out the specified number of nails they can pound into the log (saves setting a timer).

Some of the children quickly learn how to pull out the nails in order, to extend their turn. The fine motor skill, counting and name writing practice are easily disguised.

Good resources for the materials include: local lumber stores, hardware stores, building sites, etc.


 

Name:
Maura Toohey-Carlisle
Email:
Boomshiva@msn.com
 

Date: 5-25-99

For a cooperative approach to wood working try making a class planter box. Have a parent set out the right lengths of wood and all the materials needed for each child to have a turn helping make a planter box. The parent helper or teacher then calls a small group of children over to build the box together to take turns hammering, gluing, or drilling holes. The Students can then review with the whole class the job they had , put the jobs in the order of construction and see how the box was put together piece by piece with help from all the students in the class. We then paint the box in a similar way letting each child have a turn putting a freehand decoration on the box. We have given our final projects to the principal, other parent helpers as thank you gifts, and kept some for planting seeds during our life cycles unit.


Name::
Renee
Email:
snellmr@alltel.net
 

Date: 5-25-99

We put small block of wood, tongue depressors, and paper road signs. allow the children to glue these to the wood however they wish when dry they can be used in the block area for road signs.


 

Name:
Margie
Email:
mbulger@hotmail.com

Date: 5-25-99

ACTIVITY: WOOD MATCH UP

AGES: 3-5 years

AREA OF ROOM: Woodworking, Science, Math, Manipulatives, Outdoors

MATERIALS: 1. Hanging wood samples (you will find these at your local Home Depot/Builders Square in the kitchen area...they are the samples of Formica counter top colors...just take 2 each of a few different shades of wood) 2. Pine square board with nails or safe-type hooks spaced out approx. 2-3 inches.

PROCEDURE: 1. Show the children each sample, talk about the different colors...their names...etc. 2. Hang one of each color on each hook/nail, etc. 3. The children can hang the 2nd...to MATCH to the one hanging.

I HOPE THIS IS EXPLAINED WELL ENOUGH TO UNDERSTAND.

Name:
Michele
E-Mail:
michelef@leek12.fl.us
 

Date: 3-19-99

Talk to a local contractor to get "scraps" of wood. I also have woodworking magazines on my table to give them idea of some things to create. We are also going to go to Home Depot to see the large selection of real tools, and to make a project to take home.


Name:

Jeff Woodruff
E-Mail:
jwoodruff@pasadena.isd.tenet.edu
 

Date: 3-19-99

This isn't an idea, just a suggestion. Use local residential construction sites as your source for scrap wood. Many home builders are happy to give you material you wouldn't typically ask for. You will be surprised when you tell them who is doing what with what! Local cabinet shops and even local home centers such as Builders Square or Home Depot will be thrilled to let you have what they consider scrap.

Additionally, check with the paint department of these local home do it yourself centers. Many of them throw away paint that was custom mixed and then returned because it wasn't the right color. I have gotten lots of free paint for student projects this way!


Name:

Shandra
E-Mail:
shandrapedersen@usa.net
 

Date: 3-19-99

A great way to get lumber for your woodworking center is to go to local hardware stores such as Home Depot and ask if they have any scraps that they would be willing to donate to your program. They can also provide sawdust. Sometimes you need to provide your own bag to bring it home. Also, look in the phonebook for wood shops. They usually love to donate to schools. They can provide you with a large selection of shapes also.


Name:

Renee
E-Mail:
snellmr@alltel.net
 

Date: 3-19-99

We put small block of wood, tongue depressors, and paper road signs. allow the children to glue these to the wood however they wish when dry they can be used in the block area for road signs.


 

Name: Tracy E-Mail: grant.miller@sympatico.ca

Date: 1-20-99

I put a big log along with a few nails and hammer in our woodworking center. The kids love it and it doesn't take up a lot of space.


Name: Valarie E-Mail:  

Date: 1-20-99

A good source for small pine boards is a local tai kwon do or karate studio. My nephew took lessons for a few years and began breaking boards in half. The school would just toss out the wood. (It was a lot of boards from all the classes that did this.) My brother asked if he could start picking it up and he and my sister-in-law used it to do decorative painting. It would be great for young kids to do their own projects on real wood. (Even painting.)


Name: Linda E-Mail: li8er@cros.net

Date: 1-19-99

Instead of building, try taking apart. Pick up from Goodwill tape recorders, radios, hair dryers, etc, cut off electrical cords and give the children hammers, screw drivers, etc and let them take apart and see how its made. Lots of fun!!!


Name: sharon Email cutshall@havnet.com

Date: 1-10-99

I have two very enjoyable loves in life. One is painting on wood and the other is teaching. I have my kindergarten class paint simple wood shapes such as hearts, snowmen, Christmas tree or even a turkey shaped wood cut out. I show them how to sand, and base coat the cut out and do some simple details such as facial features or dots. The children are very eager to do these and their parents are very pleased with their efforts.


Name:

cynthia Email: pep@coslink.net

Date: 1-7-99

Use 6 thin pieces of wood all the same size 6in X 6in is good. You will have the kids glue them together like a box, except the top piece, for that use small hinges(less than 1.00 at local hardware) and glue them on to use for lid. Can be used for jewelry box, gift, game box, etc. Can decorate with paper and glue, colored glue, crayons or paint.


Name: Sherri Email:  

Date: 1-7-99

Provide wood blocks and sandpaper in your woodworking area. The children enjoy sanding off the rough edges of the blocks. This is a wonderful fine motor skill for little hands.


Name:

Kristi Email: mnb2b@ibm.com

Date: 1-7-99

We have a day when Dad's (or Grandpas, Uncles etc.) are invited to come and do woodworking. We put out several workbenches with glue, wood pieces, tools, goggles.... and simple project ideas that a child can build with their special person. Then we have a painting table where they can paint their creation. We also have a snack table and we make it a fun morning just for kids and their dads.

Project ideas:   sailboat, airplane, train, car. So we have lots of misc. items to help spark creativity for shy Dads.


Name: Tami Email: vittummakinen@cyberportal.net

Date:  12-30-98

Provide paper and pencils for planning. My students have enjoyed some great cooperative planning and are now building projects together!


Name: Nancy E-mail: photobug@ginetworks.com

Date: 12-27-98

For beginning "woodworkers" scrounge some large pieces of packing foam then add golf tees and a plastic hammer. Hammer the golf tees in, remove and hammer again. If you want to get fancy you can cover the foam with burlap.

area

woodworking


Name: Nancy E-mail: photobug@ginetworks.com

Date: 12-27-98

Glue, clamps and wood scraps from the local lumberyard add up to great wood creations. Be sure to pre-select a place for them to dry. Colored glue can add interesting variety.