Preschool Halloween Art


Egg Carton Spiders.

I cut apart an egg carton and gave each child a slot (the place where the egg goes.)  Then I let them paint it all black and let it sit to dry.  The next day, I give them eight short pieces of black pipe cleaner and let them poke them into the egg carton.  It comes out looking just like a spider!  Ahead of time, I buy bags of the fake cobwebs and then let them hang their spiders on them around the room!  They make great Halloween decorations!


Grocery Bag Ghosts.

Get a white plastic grocery bag and cut circles in it. Put cotton balls in the center and wrap the bag around it.  Tie a long thread around the neck and attach it to a stick.  Draw a face with a marker.  The kids love to run around flying their ghosts, making scary noises.  They rattle nicely, too.


Paper Pumpkins.

Materials: 15″ balloon, old newspaper, paper mache, flour, water.

Give each child a balloon and show them how to get the paper covered with flour mixture.  Putting the balloon in a cereal bowl helps keep the balloon from rolling all over the place.  When it’s dry, have them paint the pumpkin orange (you could then either have them draw on a face, or if you want, you could cut out the eyes, mouth, and nose and a hole in the bottom and a hole in the top put it over a votive candle.)


This is a similar idea to the footprint ghosts.  We traced the kids’ feet on white construction paper and drew ghost faces on the heels with a marker.  Then we cut them out, punched holes and hung them with string.  We ended up hanging ours from the ceiling fan, and now they are “flying!”  We are also thinking of making mobiles with the ghosts.


Web Rubbings.

Cut a piece of cardboard into an octagon.  Using white glue or a fabric paint with the squeeze tip bottle top, draw a spider web onto the cardboard and outline with lines of glue or fabric paint.  When dry, you will have a raised-lined spider web.  Show the children how to clip an octagon of paper onto the cardboard, and use a crayon on it’s side to rub over the paper.  The web will rub through.  Using an ink pad, show the child how to stamp a thumb print for the spider’s abdomen and a finger print for the head (talk about how spiders have 2 body parts.)  Add a fine tip marker so the child can draw 8 legs.  Plastic flies can also be glued on for the spider’s dinner.

Share an idea you have used in your classroom or at home that pertains to this theme.