Easter Art


Easter Egg Puzzle Wreath

Supplies: old puzzles missing pieces glue spray paint holder (something to use to hold the wreath up when finished) can be a pipe cleaner attached.

Take the old puzzle pieces first and spray paint (adult only) and if you do them in solid color, then I went back and did a splatter color over top in a darker shade. Let dry. Add a hanger to one corner piece (this is the child’s starting place). Lay out a sheet of wax paper and put a dab of white glue up in the corner and let the kids start putting the pieces on top of each other to form an egg shape. Then we used the little confetti bunnies and added them to further decorate. Let dry and you have your Easter Egg.

Each egg turns out different, we did 4 different colors and they shapes were great. Then it is fun to see some kids want more decorations and some want less.

Be sure to tell them the shape is to be an egg. Also with that you can go around and help shape the egg if it isn’t shaping up to look like an egg.

When we were the done the kids just loved what they had done. We put them on a paper plate when dried, and wrapped them up with colored tissue paper and tied the corner up with ribbon.


Allow the children to paint on white paper using spring colors. They can finger-paint, paint with rolling marbles or tennis balls, spatter paint, etc. You choose! When dry, cut into large egg shapes and place around your room for great color and no two alike!


Shrink the Rubber Egg

You’ll need: The rubber egg from the previous experiment, clean jar with lid, corn syrup

Pour corn syrup into the jar until it is three inches deep. Gently place the egg in the jar. Screw on the lid.

leave the egg in the jar for three days. Check the egg every once in awhile.

The egg, this time, shrinks and wrinkles up – becoming very small and rubbery.

The water molecules inside the egg move through the egg’s membrane into the corn syrup. The corn syrup will not move into the egg because its molecules are too big to fit through the tiny holes of the membrane. particles move in and out of your body’s cells this way.


My class had a lot of fun making egg hunt collages. First, they each drew a basic landscape (grass, sky) on a large sheet of paper. Next, they cut and glued pictures of outdoor objects — trees, cars, playground equipment, dogs, etc. — from magazines to complete the scene. Finally, they drew the Easter Bunny with crayons and glued on dyed shell macaroni “eggs” all over the landscape! For some reason, this project really appealed to the four-year-old sense of humor! They really enjoyed getting to be the ones to “hide” the eggs!


Inflate and tie a small balloon for each child. Make a thin glue and water mixture, and have the children “paint” sections of the balloon and then lay squares of tissue paper down flat onto the glue. The tissue should overlap and cover the entire balloon. Let dry on wax paper, or hang to dry from the knotted end of the balloon over newspaper. When the balloon is completely dry, use scissors to cut a small slit in the balloon neck. The balloon will deflate, leaving a beautiful, hollow tissue paper “egg”. For a parent gift, these may be filled with lightweight candies, and then sealed with one more square of tissue.

Share an idea you have used in your classroom or at home that pertains to this theme.